Commit bbb76723 authored by Jake Read's avatar Jake Read

typos

parent b795280d
......@@ -6,8 +6,8 @@ This project is largely a follow-on to [my Teensy-Powered Brushless Motor Contro
TESC, April 2016 - August 2016
*As the world turns,
so did those motors,
once around is never enough*
so did those motors.
Once around is never enough*
Eulagies aside, I am still motivated to do this. Brushless motors are the go-to motive force for electromechanical systems. By that I mean that just about any time you see a robot-like thing, or machine, moving about, there's a big likelihood that the thing doing-the-moving has a brushless motor in it's guts - or some variant thereof (stepper motors count as BLDCs in my books).
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ Eulagies aside, I am still motivated to do this. Brushless motors are the go-to
And a GIF. While the rotor rotates, different switches are connected to current, and the coils - to - pads relationship is set up such that the current will cause the motor to rotate. Pardon my abbreviated explanation.
![brushed-dc]((https://gitlab.cba.mit.edu/jakeread/mkbldcdriver/raw/master/images/brushed-dc.gif)
![brushed-dc](https://gitlab.cba.mit.edu/jakeread/mkbldcdriver/raw/master/images/brushed-dc.gif)
Brushes are awesome - and make motors very simple. You just pump voltage (so current) through the rotor, and things happen. However, there are resistive losses at the brushes, as well as friction losses.
......@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ With the advent of transistor technology (for switching logic AND for switching
**(3) Brushless Motors rotate the magnetic field with switches** - so we can make the coils stationary, and 'artificially' switch the direction and timing of current flowing through them. Here's a nice GIF of sinusoidal commutation (where phase currents follow a nice, smooth wave).
![bldc-animation]((https://gitlab.cba.mit.edu/jakeread/mkbldcdriver/raw/master/images/bldc-motor-vectors.gif)
![bldc-animation](https://gitlab.cba.mit.edu/jakeread/mkbldcdriver/raw/master/images/bldc-motor-vectors.gif)
We can see the three current vectors (that translate into a combined magnetic field vector). We also have a simpler type of switching, where we only turn two of the three phases on at a time. You can see an example of that [here](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFI7VW6WGR4) - including a nice diagram of the switch setup.
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment